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Old 05-01-2009, 10:12 PM
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Location: South Central Kansas
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Default Cummins 6.7L P1451 and P242F Diesel Paticulant Filter Codes

P1451-DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTER SYSTEM PERFORMANCE

The engine Exhaust system monitors the soot load in the Aftertreatment diesel particulate filter. Under normal operating conditions the Aftertreatment diesel particulate filter is self-cleaning, where accumulated soot is converted to ash. Under light load operating conditions, the driver may be notified via the vehicle's EVIC message center ("CATALYST FULL: SEE OWNERS MAN" message will be displayed) that it is necessary to modify the vehicles driving routine/duty-cycle (see Owner's Manual for details) in order to allow the Aftertreatment diesel particulate filter system to self clean. If the vehicle's EVIC message center notification is ignored, the vehicle will eventually derate the engine and set a fault, requiring service. The soot load in the Aftertreatment diesel particulate filter is estimated by the ECM using the Exhaust Pressure Sensor values and the calculated soot output of the engine. This fault code will be triggered if the application is not operating at a duty cycle high enough to allow active regeneration of the Aftertreatment diesel particulate filter. This fault code is an indication that the exhaust temperatures exiting the turbocharger are not high enough to allow active regeneration of the soot that is trapped in the Aftertreatment diesel particulate filter. It may be necessary to increase the duty cycle of the application in order to prevent excessive soot accumulation and plugging of the Aftertreatment diesel particulate filter. The ECM will set this fault if it detects that the soot level has exceeded the normal desoot trigger threshold by a sufficient amount to indicate that the driver intervention is required. There is not a MIL lamp associated with this fault code, though the driver will be notified via the EVIC message.
  • When Monitored: Engine Running
  • Set Condition: The ECM will set this fault if it detects that the soot level has exceeded the normal desoot trigger threshold by a sufficient amount to indicate that the driver intervention is required.
Possible Causes
ENGINE HAS BEEN OPERATING IN LIGHT LOAD CONDITIONS THAT PREVENT EXHAUST TEMPERATURES FROM BEING HIGH ENOUGH TO ACTIVELY REGENERATE THE AFTERTREATMENT PARTICULATE FILTER
PROGRESSIVE DAMAGE TO THE AFTERTREATMENT SYSTEM FROM AN ENGINE FAILURE, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO EXCESSIVE FUEL, OIL OR COOLANT IN THE AFTERTREATMENT SYSTEM
EXHAUST LEAK PREVENTING DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTER REGENERATION TEMPERATURES FROM BEING ACHIEVED


P242F-DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTER RESTRICTION - ASH ACCUMULATION

The engine aftertreatment system monitors the soot load in the aftertreatment diesel particulate filter. Under normal operating conditions, the aftertreatment diesel particulate filter is self-cleaning, where soot is converted to ash. Under light load operating conditions, the driver may be notified via the vehicle's EVIC message center that it may be necessary to modify the vehicles driving routine in order to allow the aftertreatment diesel particulate filter system to self clean. If the vehicle's EVIC message center notification is ignored, the vehicle will eventually derate the engine and set a DTC and MIL lamp, requiring service. The soot load in the aftertreatment diesel particulate filter is estimated using the Exhaust Pressure sensor and the calculated soot output of the engine. This fault code can be triggered if the application is not operating at a duty cycle high enough to actively regenerate the aftertreatment diesel particulate filter. This fault code indicates that the exhaust temperatures exiting the turbocharger are not high enough to actively regenerate the soot that is trapped in the aftertreatment diesel particulate filter. It may be necessary to increase the duty cycle of the application in order to prevent plugging of the aftertreatment diesel particulate filter. This fault will be triggered if the electronic control module (ECM) detects that the soot load of the aftertreatment diesel particulate filter has surpassed the most severe level threshold. The aftertreatment diesel particulate filter needs to be replaced, do not regenerate this filter. The ECM will illuminate the MIL lamp immediately when the diagnostic runs and fails. The driver will be notified via the vehicle's EVIC Message Center (CATALYST FULL: SERVICE REQD). The ECM will also initiate a derate of engine power output in an effort to protect the vehicle aftertreatment system. The ECM will turn off the MIL lamp immediately after the soot load in the aftertreatment diesel particulate filter has dropped below the severe level threshold (this should be accomplished through replacing the aftertreatment diesel particulate filter) and the DTC has been cleared.
  • When Monitored: The diagnostic runs continuously when the engine is running.
  • Set Condition: The ECM detects that the soot load of the aftertreatment diesel particulate filter has surpassed the most severe level threshold. The aftertreatment diesel particulate filter requires replacement.
Possible Causes
PROGRESSIVE DAMAGE TO THE AFTERTREATMENT SYSTEM FROM AN ENGINE FAILURE, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO EXCESSIVE FUEL, OIL OR COOLANT IN THE AFTERTREATMENT SYSTEM MAY CONTRIBUTE TO A HIGH PRESSURE RELATED FAULT.
AFTERTREATMENT DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTER COULD BE PLUGGED WITH ACCUMULATED ASH.
OPERATING IN LIGHT LOAD CONDITIONS THAT PREVENT EXHAUST TEMPERATURES FROM BEING HIGH ENOUGH TO ACTIVELY REGENERATE THE AFTERTREATMENT PARTICULATE FILTER.
TEMPERATURE SENSOR(S) FAILED IN-RANGE LOW
__________________

2007.5 Dodge Ram 3500 HD,QC, 6.7L Cummins, 6speed Auto, 4X4, Bighorn Edition.
Click for installs: Carr Steps PML Diff Cover Edge Juice with Attitude Volant Intake Hankook ATM RF10
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Old 08-24-2014, 09:20 PM
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Join Date: Jul 2014
Posts: 3
Default Catalyst full message

Ok... I have a serious question. I have a 2007 ram 2500 6.7l. driving from Indiana to Washington State with a trailer and truck full. Got to South Dakota and got an MIL and evac warning saying catalyst is full. Truck is blowing smoke and running rough. What can I do to get it running right???
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Old 08-29-2014, 06:46 PM
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Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: New Richmond, Wisconsin
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Do the deletes unplug egr then send all those useless emissions crap back to the epa
and if your still stuck out there put the truck in 3rd and keep the rpms up for a long while hopefully will burn out the exhaust enough to make it home, then delete that crap
can you tell i hate emissions?
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2008 Ram 2500 6.7, 68RFE, 3.55 Rear, dpf/egr delete, H&S Tuner 175 tune W/Overdrive, AFE 4" exhaust, Quadzilla Scout II Monitor, s366, steed speed manifold
2002 Ram 1500 5.9L GAS

EPA (Economy Poisoning Agency)
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Old 01-28-2016, 11:39 AM
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Hi All,

I have never posted here before, but have spent a great deal of time on this forum and other Cummins and diesel forums looking for information about this code. After learning a great deal via hard experience, I hope to share a little bit back here.

I'm an ASE certified Master Technician and maintain a fleet of vehicles, including a 2007.5 Ram 3500 with the 6.7L Cummins. At approximately 100k miles, this truck first set P1451 and P242F codes. Despite steam cleaning the DPF I was unable to clear these codes and eventually sent the truck to my nearest dealer (4 hours away). A new turbo and $7,000 later, the truck ran perfectly and the check engine light was off. The dealer did warn that the DPF had probably accumulated a great deal of ash and may be near the end of its useful life.

About three weeks ago and 40k miles later, dreaded P242F appeared again, along with P1451. This time, I wasn't going to waste my time and money at the dealer. Using my OTC Genisys, I was able to view a great deal of data on the exhaust stream and engine performance. No other codes were set an all other systems were operating normally. I tried everything I've seen suggested to clear this code including using two cheap scan tools, my Genisys, a Snap-on scanner that I borrowed, and leaving the batteries disconnected overnight. The code remained. The datastream on my Genisys told me that regeneration was disabled, and a hard test drive with a loaded trailer confirmed that the system would not regenerate. This was as far as I could go.

After a great deal of research, I bought a very nice used Chrysler StarScan (dealer diagnostic scan tool) on Ebay. Apparently this had belonged to a trade school and had hardly been used - it had the last software update that Chrysler had issued and all the accessories. It worked flawlessly when connected to my truck, and it taught me a great deal about the P242F and the DPF itself.

Even the StarScan cannot clear the P242F code when it is active. When the code is active, the ECU is indicating that it sees an existing problem and there is no point in clearing a code -- it would reappear instantaneously. In order to clear the code, the underlying factors that cause it to appear need to be addressed. In fact, when I looked at the freeze frame data, I saw that this code was set with the engine OFF -- 0 RPM.

Looking at the data stream from the ECU, what was clearly the problem was the "Estimated soot load based on delta pressure". In other words, the ECU was calculating how much soot was caught in the DPF based on the pressure differential between the pre-DPF sensor and the post-DPF sensor. In my truck, this was 37 grams. The actual pressure differential was 0.44 inches of mercury at idle.

I tried to do a stationary regen at this time using the StarScan. It would not initiate the test. Regeneration was still listed as disabled because of the P242F.

Figuring that my DPF was terminal, I bought a lightly-used and cleaned one from a reputable reseller on EBay and installed it. Now at idle, my pressure differential was 0.3 inches of mercury. The estimated soot load started to drop, and I took the truck for a drive. The load continued to drop down to 24 grams and remained pretty steady there after twenty miles of driving. The P242F remained active.

At this point, I used the one feature of the StarScan that is irreplaceable: Reset Regenerative Filter Timers. This one step cleared the ECU's memory of all data related to the DPF and immediately my estimated soot load dropped to 0. My pressure differential remained the same at about 0.3 inches of mercury, but now there was no soot load estimated to be in the DPF. After about 100 miles of hard towing, there was a little more than 1 gram estimated.

Here's my conclusion:

P242F is set based on values calculated by the ECU using the delta pressure measurement across the DPF. The code will remain active and cannot be cleared by any means until that calculated value drops below a certain threshold (I haven't been able to find out what it is -- something between 1 and 24 grams, based on my experience). There are two ways to bring that calculated value down:

1. If your estimated soot load is not terribly high and you can clean out your DPF with a hose or pressure washer, it seems possible that you can then drive for 10-20 miles and the ECU will recalculate the load down far enough that the code will go from "active" to "stored", which could then be cleared with any cheapo scan tool.

2. If your estimated soot load is as high as mine was, the ECU will probably not recalculate the estimated down no matter what you do. My new (used) DPF with a single gram of soot in it was only recalculated down to 24 grams because the ECU uses stored data in addition to pressure differential to calculate the load. I could not get this value down any lower. I had to use a StarScan to reset the regenerative filter timers. Immediately upon erasing this historical data from the ECU, my estimated soot load dropped to zero even as my pressure differential remained the same. Other scan tools may be able to perform this function, but my OTC Genisys cannot.

Lessons learned:

Make sure that you have identified any underlying problems that have caused excessive soot (for instance, problems with fueling, turbo, or EGR). If you have any other codes besides P1451 and P242F, diagnose and repair those FIRST.

Try removing, cleaning, and driving with your DPF to see if you can bring the estimated soot load down. Without a fancy scan tool you won't be able to see this number, but if it works your CEL may turn off or you may be able to turn it off with a cheap scan tool. As long as the estimated value remains high there is NO WAY to clear the code.

If the above doesn't work, the only way to address this problem is to reset the regenerative filter timers. If your DPF is full, this will probably need to be accompanied by a stationary regen and will probably serve as a temporary fix at best. It seems to me that only a Chrysler scan tool can do this.

Final note: if you work on your truck yourself, I have found that a good used StarScan was a worthy investment for the $1,000 I paid. It is limited to only a few years' worth of vehicles and no longer has any technical support, but I'm certain that I made back my investment in this one fix by avoiding a trip to the dealer.

I hope that this is helpful to somebody else out there. Best of luck!
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